Dagnabbit!

No matter how experienced you are at your craft, odds are there will come a day where you make mistakes. Big or small, experienced or not, glaringly obvious or maybe nobody will see it, mistakes are a frustrating part of the crafter’s life. I have made a few such blunders in my current project, and am now in my second time undoing the glaringly obvious mistakes and having to do it all again.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above, you can see that I’ve been decreasing my stitches directly beside the cable. This is forming a sleeve on a sweater. Turns out, I should have been decreasing right into the cables, because the cables themselves do not continue to move upward beyond the sleeve.

$^%!^&$@#^&@$&^U^!T*

Needless to say, that’s a lot of rows to have to take out.

So, I decided to take the opportunity to take detailed shots of how to unknit what has already been knit. It’s tedious, takes just as long as it does to knit, and is super frustrating. This is why I hate to make mistakes at all. But learning how to unknit is still much easier than tearing the entire project out and starting over again.

Unknit the knit!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Insert the left-hand needle front to back through the knit stitch.

Make sure that when you do this step, you are inserting your needle into the stitch your loop is coming through (the next row down), not directly into the loop.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Transfer the stitch onto the left-hand needle, and slide the loop off the right-hand needle.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now your stitch has been unknit.

Rinse and repeat. Over and over again until you get back to the spot where you first goofed.

Unpurl the purl!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Insert your left-hand needle into the purl stitch front to back.

It helps if you hold your yarn up tightly to open up the purl. You’re going to want to attack the purl from the side but resist the urge. Doing so will twist the stitch and you’ll have to untwist all the stitches that get twisted. Go front to back.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Transfer the stitch onto the left-hand needle and slip the loop off the right-hand needle.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Now your stitch has been unpurled.

Rinse and repeat. Over and over.

Like I said, it’s tedious business. It takes a little while to get the hang of undoing the stitches that have been done, just like it takes a while to get the hang of making the stitches in the first place. But it’s still a heck of a lot easier than starting from the beginning again. Remember to have patience and resist the temptation to tear the needles out entirely. Keep your yarn from getting tangled, and take a deep breath. Your project is going to look just fine once you get it finished.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Dagnabbit!

    • Thank you! I can’t say I do much frogging, I typically just tink along no matter how many rows I have to go back. I’m too paranoid that I’ll drop stitches and then have to deal with that consequence.

      I’ll be posting pics of the project once I have it completed, check back later for the full scoop! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s